De Gedachten zijn Vrij * Free Speech: Charlie Hebdo, Pol Hoste, Anti-Bomb Songs

NEW * NIEUW: CHARLIE HEBDO special **  (2016+26 = 2016/01)

charlie hebdo cover 13jan2015

There is no freedom without freedom of speech: always, everywhere and for everyone. Anything less is a violation of it.

NEW * NIEUW: Mondays & Tuesdays at 12:00 and 16:00 hrs :   CHARLIE HEBDO REMEMBERED ** 
REPEATED: “Lay Off” by 7:84 Theatre Company; Pol Hoste, Jack Kerouac **  Songs Against the Bomb **  Armand (RIP), Antoine, The Subterraneans  ** 

SCHEDULE:
MONDAYS  & TUESDAYS 12:00 > 20:00 hrs CET or 11 a.m. > 7 p.m. GMT (UK)
RADIO 68 TIME = Central European Time (Brusssels, Paris, Berlin) =  GMT+1 (London). Example:  16:00 hrs  CET  (Brusssels) = 3 p.m. GMT (London).
FORMAT
Free Speech consists of four 60-minute shows.  A new show is added each week. It is followed by three shows of the previous week.

THE PLAYLISTS: 1 NIEUW * NEW: CHARLIE HEBDO REMEMBERED
MONDAYS &  TUESDAYS 12:00 noon and 16:00 hrs CET (11 a.m.  / 3 p.m. UK time)
Hans Teeuwen, Lenny Bruce, Tom Lehrer, Youp van ‘t Hek, Alain Verdier, Tim Minchin ** Het Pandinistisch Verblijdingsfront * Vuile Mong en de Vieze Gasten: Bommerskonten * Leen Persijn: Alles is te koop

THE PLAYLISTS: 2 REPEATED / HERHALING:
MONDAYS &  TUESDAYS 13:00 and 17:00 hrs CET (12 noon  / 4 p.m. UK time)
“Lay Off” by 7:84 Theatre Company :
Radio 68 plays the entore LP released in 1975 + PEACE SONGS: Donovan, Melanie, CSN&Y, Elvis Costello,, Joe Cocker; Leon Rosselson. 

MONDAYS &  TUESDAYS 14:00 and 18:00 hrs CET (1 p.m. / 5 p.m. UK time)
POL HOSTE, JACK KEROUAC 
DE VERZWEGEN BOON, hoofdstuk 3: exclusieve voorleessessie voor Radio 68, met muziek gekozen door de auteur voor deze uitzending: JAN DE WILDE ** BOUDEWIJN DE GROOT  ** DEGENHARDT, SUVERKRUPP u.a. **  + JACK KEROUAC with Al Cohn & Zoot Sims: BLUES AND HAIKUS  ** PLUS: T-BONE WALKER  &  NINA SIMONE

MONDAYS &  TUESDAYS 15:00 and 19:00 hrs CET (2 p.m. / 6 p.m. UK time)
SONGS AGAINST THE BOMB
: V.A. Topic LP “Songs Against the Bomb”, 1960, with The London Youth Choir, Ewan McColl, Peggy Seeger, Leon Rosselson, Fred and Betty Dallas, Jack Elliot, a.o.
And also: Bonnie Dobson, Jeff Beck Group feat. Ron Wood and Rod Stewart, Sun Ra, The Byrds, Charles Mingus, Bobbie Gentry

Charlie Hebdo: some victims
Charlie Hebdo: some victims

CHARLIE HEBDO REMEMBERED
CHARLIE HEBDO SPECIAL: (I’M) LAUGHING YOUR HEAD OFF:  HANS TEEUWEN, YOUP VAN ’t HEK, VUILE MONG, ALAIN VERDIER ** TIM MINCHIN, PHIL OCHS, LENNY BRUCE **   TOM LEHRER -, MELANIE **

 

7:84 THEATRE COMPANY: LAY OFF 

784 Theatre Co Lay Off LP Cover

“The title of the company derived from a 1966 statistic that 7% of the population of Great Britain owned 84 % of the wealth. The company split in two in 1973 to form 7:84 (England) and 7:84 (Scotland). The aims of 7:84 were to present the realities of working class life and history to working class audiences in venues shunned by established national and regional companies”. (Source:  University of Glasgow).

“Based on extensive research, Lay Off scrutinizes how several inter-connecting factors: scientific advancements; new technologies; Henry Ford’s production line; increased mechanisation; changing labour relations; the failures of the TUC and the capitulation of governments to big business, contribute to the formation of large-scale corporations intent on generating increased profits from an exploited international workforce. In many ways, Lay Off echoes recent political commentary and activism around anti-globalisation and the all-pervasive influence of corporatism, documented in Naomi Klein’s No Logo. Certainly, twenty-seven years after Lay Off was written, McGrath’s s recognition of the erosion of national borders as ultimate capitalist utopia appears alarmingly prophetic in the context of a world dominated more and more by American economic interest and the World Trade Organization” (Source: International Journal of Scottish Theatre, vol. 3, no.2, Dec. 2002)
Reference:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/specialcollections/collectionsa-z/scottishtheatrearchive/stacollections/784/ 
http://www.robertrae.co.uk
http://www.arts.gla.ac.uk/scotlit/asls/ijost/Volume3_no2/6_holdsworth_n.htm

POL HOSTE

Pol Hoste cover verzwegen boon

“Schrijver Pol Hoste is een man van vrije woorden.  Op een uitzondering na, passen de meeste Vlaamse schrijvers, van Rodenbach over Gezelle tot  Claus en Lanoye, in een katholieke traditie. Hun taal en hun mentaliteit worden hier dan ook verstaan, ook als ze het geloof en de traditie afzweren. Hoste daarentegen stamt uit een communistisch  en atheïstisch gezin. Daardoor heeft hij met de Vlaamse literaire traditie niets van doen. Zijn taal en zijn denkkader worden in Vlaanderen niet goed begrepen. Hij stoort . Per definitie bijna.” (Eddy Bonte)

Lees hier de volledige tekst:

http://community.dewereldmorgen.be/blog/eddyb/2014/05/04/waarom-de-nieuwe-mens-niet-is-ontstaan

 

 

SONGS AGAINST THE BOMB

Jef Nutall Bomb Culture cover

“Songs Against the Bomb” was released by the Topic label in 1960 and features thirteen songs recorded between 1955 and 1959. This is a true folk record, even if a choir takes up most of side B.  Soon afterwards, the folk idiom would become immensely popular among youngsters and  symbolize, like rock’n’roll had done, revolt against the musical genres of the older generations.  For sure, the sound of the  sixties owes an awful lot to beat music, but one cannot imagine the sixties without folk. In fact, most messages about peace and love were conveyed by folk songs. Dylan started in 1962, the year The Beatles took off. The protest song often is a folk song. There is a simple reason for this: lyrics with a message are more easily communicated through a softer genre addressed to an audience that really wants to listen. Besides, all the artist needs is a guitar and maybe a harmonica and a kazoo. Folk can be played anywhere, anytime.

Many songs on “Songs Against the Bomb” were written / sung / adapted by Ewan McColl, Peggy Seeger and Fred & Betty Dallas. Jack Elliot and Leon Rosselson can be found playing the guitar on quite some tunes.  “Song Of Hiroshima”  is a Japanese song written by Koki Kinoshita.

After the bombs on Japan, Against the Bomb movements and campaigns were held all over the world. The first March in the UK was held in 1958. Nobel Prize winner Albert Camus  backed this movement, since he feared the annihilation of mankind.

Says Jeff Nuttall in “Bomb Culture”, his 1968 survey of post-war youth culture: “No longer could teacher, magistrate, politician, don or even loving parent guide the young. Their membership of the H-bomb society automatically cancelled anything they might have to say on questions of right or wrong.” In his view, “the so-called ‘generation gap’ started then” and had been widening ever since: “The people who had passed puberty at the time of the bomb found that they were incapable of conceiving of life without a future,” he wrote. “The people who had not yet reached puberty at the time of the bomb were incapable of conceiving of life with a future.”

(Jon Savage http://www.theguardian.com/music/2010/oct/31/pop-music-atomic-bomb-jon-savage)

https://mainlynorfolk.info/leon.rosselson/records/songsagainstthebomb.html

 

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