60s Albums Only *** Langspeeltijd *** Richie Havens [Mixed Bag], Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension, Faces, Arlo Guthrie, Fairport *** Monday 11 April 2022 *** [Ed’s Show, 2022-13]

NEW SHOW: Richie Havens [Mixed bag], Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension, Fairport, Faces, Arlo Guthrie *** REPEATED SHOW *** Tribute to Martin Luther King R.I.P. 04 April 1968 [Otis Spann, Champion Jack Dupree], Mavis Staples, Watts Prophets [Black Voices: In The Street, entire LP], Sly & Family Stone [Dance To The Music, entire LP], The Last  Poets *** Monday 11 April 2022, 12:00 noon till  04:00 in the morning *** Time Zone CET Brussels, Paris, Berlin *** [2022-13 = 2018-16] *** no. 215

RADIO 68: ALL THE REVOLUTIONARY SOUNDS AND VOICES THAT SHAPED THE SIXTIES 


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Showtime CETime Brussels 

  • 12:00 Richie Havens, Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension
  • 14:00 Martin Luther King R.I.P. 4 April 1968 
  • 16:00 Richie Havens, Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension
  • 18.00 Martin Luther King R.I.P. 4 April 1968 
  • 20.00 Richie Havens, Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension
  • 22:00 Martin Luther King R.I.P. 4 April 1968 
  • 24:00 Richie Havens, Don Partridge, Fifth Dimension
  • 02:00 Martin Luther King R.I.P. 4 April 1968 
  • 04:00 Show Ends Here    

01 NEW SHOWRICHIE HAVENS + DON PARTRIDGE
INTRO: FAIRPORT CONVENTION: Time Will Show the Wiser (1st LP, 1968) + ROD STEWART : A Man Of Constant Sorrow (LP, 1969, An Old Raincoat) ***
RICHIE HAVENS: MIXED BAG, 1968,  part 1 ***
Faces, Kingston Trio, Roy Harper
DON PARTRIDGE (feat. Joe Moretti and Big Jim Sullivan): DON PARTRIDGE, 1968, part 1  ***
FIFTH DIMENSION: Best Of
RICHIE HAVENS: MIXED BAG, 1968,  part  2.
DON PARTRIDGE (feat. Joe Moretti and Big Jim Sullivan): DON PARTRIDGE, 1968, part 1
FREE SPEECH: THE KINGSTON TRIO:  Where Have All  The Flowers Gone + ROY HARPER: Come The Revolution (Dream Society)

02 REPEATED SHOW: MARTIN LUTHER KING, murdered 4 April 1968
INTRO: CHAMPION JACK DUPREE + OTIS SPANN  + MARTIN LUTHER KING: I HAVE A  DREAM ***
SLY & THE FAMILY STONE: DANCE TO THE MUSIC, LP, 1968, side 1. ***
THE WATTS PROPHETS: BLACK VOICES: IN THE STREET IN WATTS, LP, 1967, side 1 ***
SLY & THE FAMILY STONE: DANCE TO THE MUSIC, LP, 1968, side 2 ***
THE WATTS PROPHETS: BLACK VOICES: IN THE STREET IN WATTS, LP, 1969, side 2 ***
THE LAST POETS: THE LAST POETS, LP, 1970, choice track ***
MAVIS STAPLES: WE’LL NEVER TURN BACK, cd, 2007, choice tracks ***

ACHTERGROND ** BACKGROUND 

RICHIE HAVENS
“Richie Havens’ finest recording, Mixed Bag, captures the essence of his music and presents it in an attractive package that has held up well. A close listen to lyrics like “I Can’t Make It Anymore” and “Morning, Morning” reveals sadness and loneliness, yet the music is so appealingly positive that a listener actually comes away feeling uplifted. In fact, on most of the songs on this album, it’s the sound of Havens’ distinctive voice coupled with his unusual open-E guitar tuning, rather than the specific lyrical content of the songs, that pulls the listener in. The six-and-a-half minute “Follow” is structured like a Dylan composition in the “Hard Rain” mode, with its memorable verse-ending refrain, “Don’t mind me ’cause I ain’t nothin’ but a dream.” Both “Sandy” and “San Francisco Bay Blues” have a jazzy feel, while the aforementioned “I Can’t Make It Anymore” would not have been out of place in a movie soundtrack or pop radio playlist of the time. “Handsome Johnny,” one of Havens ‘best known songs as a result of the Woodstock film, is a classic anti-war ballad, stoked by the singer’s unmistakable thumb-chorded guitar strumming. Mixed Bag winds up with a soulful cover of  Dylan  “Just Like a Woman” and an electric piano-propelled take on the Lennon-McCartney classic, “Eleanor Rigby.”
AllMusic Review by Jim Newsom  / All Rights Reserved

WATTS PROPHETS
“ The West Coast’s answer to The Last Poets (NY), Prophets didn’t get quite the same recognition for their contributions to raising black consciousness and laying the foundations for rap. The group was formed at the Watts Writer’s Workshop, an organization started by screenwriter Budd Schulberg designed to provide a creative outlet in the wake of the 1965 Watts riots. Father Amde Hamilton (an Ethiopian Orthodox priest, born Anthony Hamilton), Otis O’Solomon, and Richard Dedeaux met in the workshop circa 1967, and soon began performing together as Watts Prophets, setting their socially and politically conscious poetry to spare, often jazzy musical backing. They won second place in an inner-city talent show, which led to a residency at John Daniels’ Maverick’s Flat club in South Central L.A.; they also performed at fundraisers, in prisons, and around their community whenever possible. In 1969, Watts Prophets debuted with The Black Voices: On the Streets in Watts. Two years later, the group released Rappin’ Black in a White World on ALA, with lyrics and vocals provided by former Motown songwriter Dee Dee McNeil. The radical, incendiary tone of their work fit right in with the emerging black power movement, and attracted unfavorable notice from the government; the home of the Watts Writers Project was destroyed by fire in 1975 after having been infiltrated by an FBI informant”.   See disclaimer below http://www.hiphopscriptures.com/the-watts-prophets/

 

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